GMAT Verbal Section

The verbal section of the GMAT gives you 75 minutes to answer 41 multiple-choice questions. The questions are designed to test your ability to comprehend written materials, evaluate arguments, and identify and correct grammatical errors. Your performance on the GMAT verbal section will receive a scaled score of 0-60.

The GMAT verbal section contains the following question types:

  1. Reading Comprehension: Reading Comprehension requires you to read a selection and then answer a number of questions about the content, tone, main idea, and structure of the passage.

  2. Sentence Correction: Sentence Correction questions present you with a sentence that may or may not contain a grammatical error. You will have to select the choice that is free from mistakes and exhibits the greatest clarity and coherence.

  3. Critical Reasoning: Critical Reasoning requires you to evaluate and understand the nature of various arguments, through identifying their conclusions, supporting evidence, and underlying assumptions.

Sentence correction questions present a statement in which words are underlined. You have to select from the answer options the best expression of the idea or relationship described in the underlined section. The first answer choice always repeats the original phrasing, whereas the other four provide alternatives.

Idiomatic expression refers to the way in which we generally match words together. Idiom errors are both the easiest and the hardest errors to spot. They are the easiest because the wrong answers naturally look wrong and the right answers naturally look right.

One of the principles of standard English usage is that if a sentence presents multiple related items or phrases, then each of those items or phrases should be presented in parallel grammatical structures. Parallelism is also called parallel structure or parallel construction.

Run-on sentences occur when a sentence with multiple independent clauses is improperly punctuated.

Sentence fragments on the GMAT usually show up as dependent clauses pretending to convey complete thoughts or as a bunch of words with something that looks like a verb but doesn't act like one.

One of the most fundamental skills in writing is the ability to make the elements of a sentence agree. If your subject is singular but your verb is plural, it is a problem.

The parts of speech work together to form sentences. The sentence, in its simplest form, consists of two parts: subject and verb. It can be said that correct combination of the subject and the verb makes a sentence.

Every sentence has a verb, which means that a sentence isn't complete without one. There are three types of verbs.

Critical Reasoning questions are major part of the verbal section of the GMAT which cannot be ignored. These questions are designed to test your logic and reasoning skills, particularly in evaluating arguments. The questions themselves could deal with almost any subject matter, and no familiarity with that subject matter is assumed or required.

The verbal section of the GMAT mixes reading comprehension questions with critical reasoning questions and sentence correction questions. So you may correct grammatical errors in a few sentences and then come across a set of reading comprehension questions. About one-third of the 41 questions in the verbal section are reading questions. You will see a split screen with an article passage on the left and a question with five answer choices on the right.

The GMAT verbal section has 41 questions, and you are allotted 75 minutes to answer them. That comes out to less than two minutes per question. If you spend too much time answering reading-comprehension questions, you have less time to consider the sentence-correction and critical-reasoning questions that also comprise the verbal section.

Each logical argument has premises and a conclusion, but not every argument comes to a conclusion in the same way. For the purposes of the GMAT, you should be familiar with two basic types of logical reasoning: deductive and inductive.

A modifier can be a single word, a phrase, or a clause whose function is to add information to the sentence. Examples of single word modifiers.

Pronouns can cause problems when they don’t agree properly with the verb they take. There are two types of errors with pronouns.

Sentences are made up of words, and each word in a sentence has a function. The parts of speech in the English language that are important to know are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions and prepositions.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain an error of subject-verb agreement. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain an error of verb tense. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain a parallelism error. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain an idiom error. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain a pronoun error. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.

Directions: In each of the following sentences, the underlined portion may contain a modifier error. If there is no error, then choice A is correct.